Afterschool Alliance Researching How COVID-19 is Affecting Programs This Fall

Afterschool Alliance has released Wave 2 of their Afterschool in the Time of COVID-19 survey findings, and are now collecting data for Wave 3.

By taking their short survey, you are lifting up challenges programs face as the pandemic continues, and, more importantly, your answers will raise awareness of the short- and long-term effects of COVID-19 on the afterschool field. Findings from these surveys are shared with federal policy makers and featured in publications such as Education Week and Youth Today.

Questions? Contact Nikki Yamashiro.

Complete their Wave 3 survey by 11:59 pm (PDT) on October 26.

The Heinz Endowments Launch Creative Learning Funding

Three young men standing together outside on a city sidewalk singing and playing a guitar

The Heinz Endowments’ Creative Learning initiative is a cross-sector strategy to cultivate an equitable creative arts and cultural learning network, improve access to transformative learning experiences for young people, and support meaningful professional opportunities for teaching artists in Pittsburgh’s out-of-school-time (OST) ecosystem. For the purpose of this initiative, creative learning will be defined as high-quality arts education in OST settings, with equitable access for the social, emotional and creative development of children and youth. Continue reading “The Heinz Endowments Launch Creative Learning Funding”

Music Orgs: Apply for a $500,000 Accelerator Award by Aug 21

The Lewis Prize for Music — a creative arts philanthropy that invests in music organizations and their leaders to facilitate positive change through access to music education — is accepting application for its annual Accelerator Awards through August 21, 2020. Three multi-year awards of $500,000 each will be awarded in January 2021. Continue reading “Music Orgs: Apply for a $500,000 Accelerator Award by Aug 21”

ArtPlace America and Creative Generation Announce New Research Initiative

Cheyenne River Youth Project’s RedCan Jam 2019. Photo: Justin Chotikul

The following post originally appeared on the ArtPlace blog on July 16, 2020.

By Jamie Hand, Director of Research Strategies, ArtPlace

Together, ArtPlace America and Creative Generation are pleased to announce a new research initiative focused on arts, culture, and youth development.

This partnership will explore the intersections of creative youth development, creative placemaking, and community development through community based, youth- and practitioner-led research. By the end of the year, a series of new web-based tools and resources will be created by and for practitioners operating in this space. Continue reading “ArtPlace America and Creative Generation Announce New Research Initiative”

Apply to the Lewis Prize for Music COVID-19 Community Response Fund by May 8

COVID-19 Community Response Fund

The Lewis Prize for Music has launched a $1 million COVID-19 Community Response Fund for Creative Youth Development leaders and youth music programs to support their responsive and adaptive efforts during COVID-19. This fund will distribute over 20 grants of $25,000 to $50,000 to youth-serving music programs. The application opens on Monday, April 20 and closes on Friday, May 8 with grants distributed on June 16. Visit The Lewis Prize for Music for more information.

AFTA’s 7 CYD Landscape Analysis Papers Now Available

AFTA cover art for landscape analysis paperAs part of Americans for the Arts’ work on their Creative Youth Development Toolkit, they commissioned field experts to produce a set of seven landscape analyses about key topics within youth development. These papers identify trends in creative youth development, share recommendations for CYD practitioners, and suggest areas for future exploration. All of them are now available online:

“Trends in CYD Programs” Landscape Analysis Released

Americans for the Arts has commissioned field experts to produce a set of seven landscape analyses about key topics within youth development. These papers identify trends in creative youth development, share recommendations for CYD practitioners, and suggest areas for future exploration.

The areas of focus of these papers are:

  1. Program Development
  2. Advocacy and Policy
  3. Working in Social Justice
  4. Program Evaluation
  5. Preparing Artists & Educators
  6. Working with Youth
  7. Funding, Sustainability, and Partnerships

The second landscape analysis to be released is Trends in Creative Youth Development Programs, by Denise Montgomery.

Trends in CYD Programs graphicFrom the Author:

Creative youth development is a dynamic field. A fierce commitment to young people actively shaping programs and to programs reflecting ever-changing communities, coupled with reflection and refinement, means that CYD program practices are continuously in development.

Drawing on the youth development literature, literature specific to creative youth development, and exchanges with CYD practitioners, in this landscape analysis I discuss five current trends in CYD program development. These five trends include: Holistic Approaches Growing as Needs Grow, Collaboration Across Sectors, New Generation of Program Staff with New Approaches, Scaling by Depth, and Establishing Creative Career Pathways. What forces are catalyzing these trends, and what do they look like in practice? Check out this quick read to find out more. The paper also includes an overview of the historical foundation of CYD program development and a summary of underpinning research.

Following discussion of the trends, you will find recommendations for action and for further exploration. As the field is ever-evolving, I invite you to be in communication regarding your work in creative youth development with any comments, ideas, and practices you would like to share or perhaps jointly explore at dmontgomery@culturethrive.com.

Read the “Trends in Creative Youth Development Programs” landscape analysis (PDF)

Register for the 2019 San Diego Creative Youth Development Summit

San Diego CYD Summit 2019 logo

Join colleagues, collaborators, youth leaders, and distinguished national guests for a day of learning, sharing, and activation.

We know that San Diego is a leader in Creative Youth Development, with organizations coming together to implement the National Blueprint on a local level and continually improving practices to maximize our collective impact. And, we also know there are still many challenges we face as a sector.

This day-long Summit includes trainings and networking opportunities for administrators, teaching artists, youth, board members, funders, and partners to come together to ensure that all young people in San Diego have access to world-class CYD programs.

CYD Practitioner registration
Funders registration
Youth Leaders registration
Evening reception registration

“Working with Youth” Landscape Analysis Released

Americans for the Arts has commissioned field experts to produce a set of seven landscape analyses about key topics within youth development. These papers identify trends in creative youth development, share recommendations for CYD practitioners, and suggest areas for future exploration.

The areas of focus of these papers are:

  1. Program Development
  2. Advocacy and Policy
  3. Working in Social Justice
  4. Program Evaluation
  5. Preparing Artists & Educators
  6. Working with Youth
  7. Funding, Sustainability, and Partnerships

These landscape analyses are one part of a larger project led by Americans for the Arts to create a new, first-of-its-kind Creative Youth Development Toolkit.

The first landscape analysis to be released is Working with Youth, by Ashley Hare.

graphic of ladder of youth participationFrom the Author:

Paulo Freire has stated “There is no student who learns and teacher who educates, but a shared power relationship where both who are taught also teach”. Still, young people are the most ignored and yet the most controlled group in our society. So often we adults find ourselves in rooms making decisions on programming and policy we think are best for young people. We make these decisions without their voices, even though they are the ones who will be directly impacted by our choices. But as we are seeing nationally and globally, young people are speaking up to become their own agents of change. They are concerned about their future when we are long gone. They want to be involved now and not when they turn 18 and legally become “an adult”. They are showing us they are not our future leaders, but they are here today. To truly give them the space they are demanding, we must rethink what it means to co-lead with young people. This paper offers practices to consider when implementing youth-driven leadership models in classrooms, afterschool programs, and community spaces.

Read the “Working with Youth” landscape analysis (PDF)